Gil Asakawa's Nikkei View | hyphen
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Hyphen magazine: Asian America UnabridgedWe've scheduled one more visualizAsian call before the end of the year, with publisher Lisa Lee and editor-in-chief Harry Mok of Hyphen magazine! If you're not familiar with Hyphen, it's the 7-and-a-half-year-old magazine that offers, as it says on the cover, "Asian America Unabridged." It's not only a fine, high-quality publication featuring strong writing and editing and graphics, it's one of the few national print media outlets that covers Asian American issues and pop culture, and it follows in the footsteps of many now-gone magazines, starting with the late, great A magazine and including such titles as TransPacific and East-West. Other mags currently being produced include KoreAm and Giant Robot, whose editor, Eric Nakamura, we spoke to earlier this year. Our conversation with Lisa and Harry about Hyphen will be at 7 pm PT (10 pm ET) on Wednesday, December 8. Register here if you're new to visualizAsian (if you've registered before you'll receive an email with the phone and webcast information; you don't need to register again). Like many magazines for Asian Americans, Hyphen is struggling financially, but the quality of its stories is never in question. We'll speak with Lee and Mok about the successes and challenges of creating Hyphen. They both have a lot to say about why they're committed to Hyphen. Here are their bios:

The cast of the Fox TV series "Glee." Erin and I have come to love "Glee!," the Fox TV series about a group of outcast students who join their high school glee club (remember how glee club people were always the nerds?). We enjoyed the sneak preview premier, which was shown last fall, and then waited with great anticipation for the season to start this spring. After several shows, though, we started to tune out the outrageous stupidity of some of the characters (faking a pregnancy to hold on to a husband; lying about the father of a pregnancy to hold on to a boyfriend) even though we really liked the dancing and singing, which are top-notch every week. So we blew it off for a few weeks, then came back to it again one week and got re-hooked by the musical numbers all over again. The first season just ended and did a pretty good job of tying up loose ends, we thought. It also left unresolved the plotline of the evil cheerleader's coach who wants to get the teacher who's the glee club sponsor fired. I just read a very good, thoughtful and laser-focused essay by Sylvie Kim of The Antisocial Ladder, which was also re-posted on Hyphen's excellent blog, that I think everyone should read.