Gil Asakawa's Nikkei View | media
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[caption id="attachment_4449" align="alignleft" width="300"] Jane Lui will be performing at the Opening Reception and Awards Ceremony for V3con.[/caption] We're deep in the planning process for V3, the Asian American Digital Media Conference, scheduled for Aug. 25 at the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles with an Opening Night Reception and Awards ceremony on Friday, Aug. 24 at the Pacific Asia...

Pretty powerful stuff. Matthew Shimura, a 9th grader from Honolulu, Hawaii won the Grand Prize for his documentary, "The Constitution and the Camps," in C-SPAN's annual StudentCam competition. The Grand Prize winner (announced March 7) received a $5,000 award and $1,000 for his teacher to buy video equipment for his school. (Coincidentally, he attends the Punahou in Oahu, where Barack...

This just in from Joni Sakaguchi of the Japanese American Resource Center of Colorado: Here's a list of PBS programs being shown for Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month through Rocky Mountain PBS. These documentaries appear a bit heavy on Pacific Islander coverage but that's cool. Especially here in Colorado, there's a great deal of interest in Pacific Islander history...

[caption id="attachment_4376" align="alignleft" width="600" caption="Connie Lim portrait by Shane Sato (courtesy of connielimmusic.com)"][/caption] The V3 Conference organizing committee got some great news last week, when we learned that singer-songwriter Connie Lim had agreed to be part of the Opening Night festivities for the third conference of Asian American digital media-ites that started as the Banana gathering way back in 2009. Lim is...

I happened to catch a terrific documentary the other night, "I Am Bruce Lee," which combines a well-researched biography of the late great martial arts star Bruce Lee with interviews with everyone from his wife Linda Lee Caldwell, to LA Lakers star (and martial artist) Kobe Bryant who discuss Lee's legacy and enormous influence on American pop culture. Much of the...

Racist headline used by ESPN after Jeremy Lin and Knicks' 2/17 loss to Hornets Sigh. I knew it couldn't last. Not only did the Knicks finally lose one, but ESPN managed to end its love affair with Lin with a helluva Dear Jeremy kissoff. ESPN last night posted a game story on some mobile editions with the headline "Chink In The Armor" (really) at 2:30 am ET, which was changed after 3 am to "All Good Things..." ESPN posted an apology this morning, by Kevin Ota, Director of Communications, Digital Media ESPN Communications, who ironically is Asian American and having a crappy weekend:
Last night, ESPN.com’s mobile web site posted an offensive headline referencing Jeremy Lin at 2:30 am ET. The headline was removed at 3:05 am ET. We are conducting a complete review of our cross-platform editorial procedures and are determining appropriate disciplinary action to ensure this does not happen again. We regret and apologize for this mistake.
The network's Rob King also tweeted a response that linked to the apology:
There's no defense for the indefensible. All we can offer are our apologies, sincere though incalculably inadequate.
I don't think this is over yet. There's no way any producer -- even the most inexperienced, underpaid, ignorant, young overnight employee -- could not know about the racist meaning of the word "chink." The headline, placed beneath an image of Lin, was a deliberate use of a racial -- and racist -- epithet. I hope some serious actions are taken by the network to both punish the person who used the word in this context, and to prevent it from happening again. Unfortunately, this wasn't the first time the word "chink" was used on ESPN ... to describe Jeremy Lin. Here's an ESPN anchor (no, it's not Walt Frazier; ignore the title beneath him) saying "chink in the armor" in a reference to how Lin can improve his game: (ESPN posted this 11-second video apology today, three days after the incident and only after the use of the word in the headline provoked outrage across the Internet.)