Gil Asakawa's Nikkei View | racism
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Yesterday I was heartened to see the news that the Cleveland Indians Major League Baseball team is going to stop using its blatantly racist caricature of an American Indian, "Chief Wahoo," on its uniforms starting the 2019 season. The leering cartoon character is so obnoxious that my wife Erin has included it for years in a workshop she gives on racist icons in American culture from Aunt Jemima to the Frito Bandito. But this being American in 2018, the philosophy of yin and yang means that for this bit of good news (the chief will be benched from uniforms but not from team merchandise) there is a balancing blast of bad news. That came at practically the same time, when I saw a post on Facebook sharing a godawful item from Walmart.com, a "Kids China Boy Costume," complete with a photo of a young white boy dressed in an inappropriate, culturally appropriate and inexcusably phony polyester suit with baggy pants, a Mandarin-collared shirt with Chinese-style knot buttons, and a matching hat with an attached queue of braided hair (which is sold separately to "improve your costume").

Erin and I attended the opening performance of "Lady Day at Emerson's Bar & Grill," a moving tribute to the tragic life of jazz singer Billie Holiday, who is remembered today for classic renditions of "God Bless the Child" and the stark song condemning the racist lynching of black men she first recorded in 1939, "Strange Fruit." Holiday was one of the most influential singers ever, whose influence crossed over jazz and blues to folk, R&B, rock and pop music. "Lady Day at Emerson's Bar & Grill" is set in a bar in Philadelphia just months before her death in July 1959 from heart failure caused by cirrhosis.

I'm the chair of the editorial board of Pacific Citizen, the national newspaper of the JACL. Below is my column in the New Year's issue of the PC. I wanted to post it here and also add even more current concerns given President Trump's rocky first three weeks, his eyebrow-raising relationships with world leaders (including Japan's Shinzo Abe, which merits...

PSY, the Korean pop sensation whose viral hit video, "Gangnam Style," has been viewed alomst 800 million times on YouTube (that's the official video, never mind the countless other users' uploads and all the spoofs and tributes), closed out the American Music Awards on Nov. 18. In a savvy, surprising and ultimately, ironic, collaboration, the 35-year-old PSY (real name: Park...

Marion Barry is the elected councilman for Washington DC's 8th Ward, but he's more commonly referred to in the District as "Mayor for Life." That's because the man seemingly has nine lives, politically speaking. He's now embroiled in a controversy over anti-Asian remarks he made a couple of months ago, but an attempt to mend fences with a community meeting today...

Pekin Chinks -- the high school school mascot name of Pekin, Ohio until 1980 In the midst of the media hullabaloo over ESPN's "Chink in the armor" headline about Jeremy Lin, I had a conversation with a journalism professor at the University of Colorado, where I work as staff adviser to the CU Independent, the student-run news website for the Boulder campus. What the media need, we decided, is remedial lessons in racist imagery and epithets. Both the editor and anchor who were disciplined by "the Worldwide leader in sports" claimed they didn't mean anything racial by the use of the phrase with the "c-word." OK, granted, the phrase is an old one used to describe a weakness in armor, but who would use the word today and NOT feel a twinge of conscience, a mental red flag, about its century of use as a racist slur? Why wouldn't you use any number of other words? Apparently, some people -- especially young people -- today don't know or don't remember that the "c-word" is the equivalent of the "n-word" to Asian Americans. That's a good thing, because it means the word is seldom used as a slur these days. But that doesn't mean we can start using it willy-nilly again. I grew up having the word hurled in my direction as kids yelled at me to "go home." I've been called every one of those words: "Jap," "Nip," "Gook," "Slope," "Chinaman," "Ching-Chong," Slant-Eye"... an entire dictionary of racist words. Some of them as you can see, have non-racial meanings, like slope or nip. But call me over-sensitive, when I see the words "chink in the armor" or "nip in the air" in print my stomach clenches. And the same goes for an awful lot of other Asian Americans, although yes, not every Asian American agrees (you can call Michelle Malkin anything you want, I guess and it won't bother her). The Asian American Journalists Association released a Media Advsiory on covering Jeremy Lin last week, and hopefully that will help curb some of the national media's dumber inclinations and make writers and editors think at least a moment before they blurt out something they'll regret later. But what can you do if some journalists (and people in general) don't know that certain words or phrases have a racial connotation, perhaps a forgotten one from the past? I've met a few people who honestly didn't know that "chink" is an offensive reference to Asians. The fact is, words and their meanings evolve. The Pekin, Illinois high school team for many decades was called the "Chinks" even though their mascot was a dragon (see the graphic above). In 1980, after years of controversy and over the objection of the students, the team was changed to the Dragons. I'm sure they didn't think the word was so bad because they didn't mean it as a racial epithet. Even the seemingly benign word "Oriental" has evolved. It originally referred to the Orient, or the Far East. Some Asians today still use the term to describe their grocery stores, and it's still commonly used to describe rugs (from the Middle East). But it was used so often as a word to refer to negative stereotypes that today, the acceptable word in common usage is "Asian." "Oriental" is for rugs, "Asian" is for people. The Asian American civil rights organization JACL has a series of pamphlets including this one, "Word can kill the spirit... 'Jap' is a derogatory term!" that lists some of the slurs that target Asians. The JACL's various pamphlets are available digitally on their website but they're hard to find. The AAJA also is revising its APA Handbook for covering Asian Americans, with this addendum currently available (they'll be combined in the new revised edition being published this summer). Other than these, there aren't a resource that I know of besides a few websites including this Wikipedia entry on ethnic slurs where people can go and learn about or check whether certain words are slurs or not. Maybe I should write a quick ebook. But here's one more example just this week of an innocent use of a word that made me feel uncomfortable, and I'm glad I acted on my instincts to reach out and educate a friend:

UPDATES BELOW, INCLUDING OTHER REACTIONS, MORE LINSANITY, FUNNY STUFF, JIN RAPPING ON LIN, AND JASON WHITLOCK AND FLOYD MAYWEATHER'S TWEETS Asian Americans have slowly become visible in American professional sports -- player by player, sport by sport. Some sports were conquered early. Most people know stars from the ice skating world such as Kristi Yamaguchi, Apolo Ohno or Michelle Kwan --...